Today’s Wordle #704 Hints, Clues And Answer For Wednesday, May 24thd

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Wednesday is back and that means it’s time for Wordle Wednesday!

Every week I set aside a couple special days to spice this column up. On Wednesdays, I post a riddle for Wordlers to solve and I post the answer on Thursday.

You’re free to send me your solution ahead of time on Twitter or Facebook.

Today’s Riddle: What comes once in a minute, twice in a moment, but never in a thousand years?

Good luck, puzzler solvers!

Alright, let’s do this Wordle! (I typed riddle, had to delete).


How To Solve Today’s Wordle

The Hint: To speak. But also: complete, absolute.

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The Clue: This word begins with a vowel.

The Answer:

.

.

.


Today’s Wordle Etymology

The word “utter” has its roots in Old English and has undergone various changes in form and meaning over time. Its etymology can be traced back to the Proto-Germanic language.

The Old English word for “utter” was “utian,” which meant “to put out” or “to expel.” This verb derived from the Proto-Germanic word “*utaz,” meaning “out.”

Over the centuries, the meaning of “utter” evolved. In Middle English, it began to encompass the sense of expressing or speaking aloud, which is closer to its modern meaning. The term “utter” came to refer to vocalizing or articulating words or sounds, especially in a clear or distinct manner.

Interestingly, the word “utter” is also related to other English words that share the same Proto-Germanic root. For example, “out,” “outer,” and “outward” all stem from the same origin, highlighting the connection between the idea of “out” and the word “utter.”


Wordle Bot Analysis

After I complete a Wordle I always head over to check in with Wordle Bot to see how I scored, both in terms of each individual guess and whether or not I outsmarted the Bot.


My guessing game today is a good example of how you can whittle away at bad luck with good follow-up guesses. My opener—doily—was the unluckiest starting word I’ve had in a few weeks, leaving me with a whopping 604 remaining possible solutions.

This seemed like a good time to bust out a more traditional opener for my second guess, and sure enough crate did the trick. With just 20 words remaining, I still had just a 5% chance of guessing right (though I didn’t know it at the time, I knew there were lots of possibilities left). I opted to once again pick a word that used up letters from the various words I could think of as possible solutions: burgh tested out the final remaining vowel, plus some letters I needed to rule out like ‘H’ and ‘B’.

This was a good strategy, eliminating every remaining word but one: utter.

Today’s Score: I get 0 points for guessing in four and -1 point for losing to the Bot, who guessed in just three today (slate / titer / utter). “That’s a loss, but not utter defeat,” he uttered to himself.

Play Competitive Wordle Against Me!

I’ve been playing a cutthroat game of PvP Wordle against my nemesis Wordle But. Now you should play against me! I can be your nemesis! (And your helpful Wordle guide, of course). You can also play against the Bot if you have a New York Times subscription.

  • Here are the rules:1 point for getting the Wordle in 3 guesses.
  • 2 points for getting it in 2 guesses.
  • 3 points for getting it in 1 guess.
  • 1 point for beating Erik
  • 0 points for getting it in 4 guesses.
  • -1 point for getting it in 5 guesses.
  • -2 points for getting it in 6 guesses.
  • -3 points for losing.
  • -1 point for losing to Erik

You can either keep a running tally of your score if that’s your jam or just play day-to-day if you prefer.

I’d love it if you gave me a follow on Twitter or Facebook dearest Wordlers. Have a lovely day!

As always, I’d love it if you’d follow me here on this blog and subscribe to my YouTube channel and my Substack so you can stay up-to-date on all my TV, movie and video game reviews and coverage. Thanks!